sCrypt founder Xiaohui Liu sees potential in dev protocol for BSV smart contracts

The creator of sCrypt, a high level language for creating smart contracts on BSV, has said the protocol will make it easier for developers to build on Bitcoin SV (BSV). Speaking at the recent CoinGeek Conference in Seoul, founder Xiaohui Liu unveiled the project to delegates, with a presentation demonstrating the platform in action.

sCrypt allows developers to access bitcoin functionality without recourse to Bitcoin’s native programming language. According to Xiaohui Liu, Bitcoin’s native language has been a barrier to development, including on BSV, due to its complexity, which makes it difficult for even experienced coders to build.

In an interview with CoinGeek’s Stephanie Tower, Xiaohui Liu said the difficulty of understanding and utilizing Bitcoin’s programming language had meant fewer innovations and developments reaching users. With sCrypt, Liu said his aim is to encourage developers to build custom BSV smart contracts with greater ease, which he expects will contribute positively to the BSV community.

The response from developers has already been positive, with Liu describing initial feedback as “positive.” This was confirmed by developers at the CoinGeek Seoul Conference, who welcomed the project as an easier way of accessing BSV smart contract functionality.

Liu said Bitcoin was designed to be more than just a tool for the transfer of money. But with its native language “not easy” to understand or implement, many of the possible applications of the technology have yet to be successfully developed.

Liu said his aim was to help realize this original vision of bitcoin, as expressed in the Satoshi whitepaper, which would allow easier access to more advanced transaction and contract types for developers.

Developers can access sCrypt online, without the need for download, thanks to the in-browser coding interface at scrypt.studio. This allows developers to program and test online on the fly, for more responsive development in a dynamic environment. With a graphical interface and SDK development underway, Liu said he expects the platform to make it substantially easier for developers to build on BSV.

His presentation was one of a number of new developments showcased at the CoinGeek Conference in Seoul, where developers gathered to learn about the latest innovations in BSV.

Craig Wright pushes Bitcoin for enterprise in Tokyo

Bitcoin should be a commodity and “just plumbing,” but it’s also “the best auditing technology in the world.” That was Dr. Craig Wright’s message to a gathering of businesspeople in Tokyo, some of whom were only just starting to learn about blockchain.

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Wright was speaking at the Bitcoin Association’s inaugural “BSV: Bitcoin for Business” program. The pilot event was aimed at delivering information on Bitcoin SV to those “not of blockchain,” i.e. businesspeople whose operations could benefit from bitcoin and associated technologies, but who are not familiar with or don’t understand it yet.

Joined by Jerry Chan of the Bitcoin Association, Wright gave a brief history of Bitcoin’s creation. Previous inventions like Digicash and eGold were great ideas, he said, but ones that ultimately failed due to large-scale criminal activity on their networks.

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Audit trails can eliminate corruption

He described his history at previous employer BDO, an auditing and assurance firm. The experience was educational—”Transparency is a huge problem and nearly every organization has some level of fraud,” he said. Fraud and corruption represented “some of the worst things on the planet,” behavior that impacted stock price and contributed to human misery in crime and poverty worldwide.

Contrary to popular belief, Bitcoin wasn’t created as an answer to the late 00s’ global financial crisis, nor was it intended to replace banks and governments. Instead, Wright said, it aims to make those institutions more transparent and fair.

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The average CDS (credit default swap) had millions of entries no-one could trace. Imagine a world where, even if you had a billion inputs, you could track them all. That’s a different world.

Within the context of offering business advice to attendees, Wright took aim at some favorite targets: exchanges like Binance, cypherpunks, and the thousands of other blockchain projects that exist today, particularly those offering utility tokens as tradable assets.

“You know what a utility token is? It’s a bus ticket, a cinema ticket,” he said. Their value shouldn’t be subject to gamblers’ speculation and it was useless to have a world where users needed to be constantly exchanging their tokens.

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We might as well go back to a barter system.

Bitcoin basics and incentives

Wright also explained how the Bitcoin network works and its key uses, with miners as incentivized rule enforcers, and the introduction of ASICs ridding the network of botnets.

In response to an audience question about how Bitcoin could replace existing national currencies, Wright said it wasn’t intended to. Bitcoin is a micropayments network with the potential for billion transactions per second; a different kind of internet. It allows privacy in transactions, something he described as the polar opposite of anonymity.

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With privacy, those involved in transactions still know who they’re dealing with. With total anonymity, no one knows anything about the other party and trust disappears.

He referred several times to electronic data interchange, or EDI—a company like Walmart could do trillions of transactions with EDI on blockchain, something “that would demolish their costs.”

Another question concerned Wright and nChain’s multiple patent applications, and whether this was compatible with Bitcoin’s vision of an open economy. He noted that even cypherpunk-affiliated developers like Hal Finney held patents on their inventions, and that they represented a guard against misuse of the technology.

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Message for Japan

The Japanese business environment is sophisticated and highly regulated. One big hurdle Bitcoin SV faces here is that it is not yet “whitelisted” by Japan’s financial regulator, the Financial Services Agency (FSA). This means it isn’t currently possible to buy or sell BSV on any of Japan’s legal exchanges.

Local advocates have begun to lobby for whitelisting, and events such as the “BSV: Bitcoin for Business” programs are intended to educate by highlighting BSV‘s law-friendly and responsible face.

Ken Shishido, representing the Japan Metanet Society, asked what Bitcoin could offer for Japanese business specifically.

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Wright replied that in the 1980s and 90s, Japan “was everything,” but had been let down by its banks and their lack of transparency.

“Japanese companies like Toyota and Sony have changed the world,” he said, and Japanese culture has always embraced new technology.

Japan can now embrace this technology and fulfill the promise of the 1980s.

Judging by the questions asked and the number of curious newcomers who approached Wright with more detailed questions after the event concluded, the message was well received.

“I was elated to see the turnout of industry professionals coming out hear Dr. Wright’s message,” stated Jerry Chan the Bitcoin Association Regional Manager of Japan & South Korea. “I felt their enthusiasm about Bitcoin’s original vision and use case, which really gave me renewed confidence that the industry is slowly maturing to be business and regulatory compatible. Also just to see Craig here in Japan, the creator of Bitcoin, as part of a ‘Satoshi’s return’ to the spiritual birthplace of Bitcoin and the entire cryptocurrency industry as a whole, was special. I was proud to be there and part of it.”

The Bitcoin Association now plans to make its “BSV: Bitcoin for Business” program a regular series, both in Japan and other locations around the world. Its message of improving business and government, rather than seeking to destroy institutions, is a positive one and far more likely to gain traction.

Alex Fauvel talks identity management at CoinGeek Seoul

Identity management is a key issue in the blockchain world, central to a number of real-world applications of the technology.

Alex Fauvel, general partner at TwoHop Ventures, took time out at the recent CoinGeek Conference in Seoul to address issues of identity management, and to discuss his plans for an on-chain solution that allows more effective, secure management of individual identity.

Fauvel said that one of the fundamental problems with blockchain at the moment is that owning a digital asset is in practice, not legally possible. This is because digital assets are effectively just data that can be copied, pasted, and passed on to anyone.

To ensure that assets can’t just be given away freely, ownership needs to be tied to a more permanent record of identity. While there have been a number of attempts to date to build this type of model, they fall down because identity is not being recorded on chain.

This means these services are relying on company servers to authenticate identity, creating a single point of failure—if a company goes bankrupt, for example, identity is lost.

Fauvel said that the solution was on-chain identity that survives any single point of failure, by recording unique identity information on the blockchain and tying this data to asset ownership.

Naturally, any data written to the blockchain can be publicly accessed, raising security concerns for those building and relying on this type of system. The solution, according to Fauvel, is to encrypt the data, as well as identity, and to hide sensitive encrypted data within other encrypted data on the chain.

He said this provides a foundation model for recording identity data securely on-chain by ensuring attackers don’t even know where to look to find the data they need to unencrypt to carry out an attack.

Billed as a general solution to secure data storage and identity management on the blockchain, Fauvel said there were a number of applications where verifiable identity was essential, such as managing title deeds on the blockchain and blockchain voting.

nChain’s Jack Davies tackles challenges of blockchain payments at Future of Money and Digital Payments

How can businesses maximize the opportunities in this changing financial landscape? That is one of the questions that will be discussed at the upcoming Future of Money and Digital Payments event in London on November 7.

The event, which is gearing up to be one of the most informative gathering related to digital payments, is hosted by Acuity Law and will include some prominent speakers with significant experience in the digital asset world: Principal speaker Nigel Dean of My PinPad will address future payment systems and payment services regulation, while Paul Harwood of Wallet Systems will discuss privacy and the challenges involved in ensuring that proper identity is established in a digital economy.

Another member of the panel that will provide a great deal of insight on digital payments is Jack Davies of nChain. Davies is a research and development scientist in blockchain technology at nChain, and has written several articles about the use of blockchain technology, and how it will play a significant role within the digital payment systems. In fact, Davies is considered one of the leading experts when it comes to Bitcoin SV (BSV).

Most of his recent work has been focused on technologies built using Bitcoin, and Davies has been looking to add utility and increase on-chain transaction volume and has been a leading developer in the Metanet project. At The Future of Money and Digital Payments, Davies will discuss the challenges presented by new blockchain payment systems—and whether BSV, Ethereum 2.0 and other cryptos can scale up to financial services.

The event will tackle the ongoing revolution in the financial industry, and how the sector is working to change how money transfers are handled. There will be a detailed discussion on digital platforms and how updated regulations are creating a number of great opportunities for new entrants to get into the market, offering them the opportunity to challenge those who have been the established authorities.

It is expected that these changes will have a dramatic impact on the banking industry and payment services, as electronic money and digital currencies are becoming increasingly popular. Those who are informed about these kinds of assets will have a clear advantage over others, as the financial markets seem to be moving towards these crypto assets.

Register to attend The Future of Money and Digital Payments, hosted by Acuity Law, at Home House in London on November 7.

Jimmy Nguyen returns to his law roots at IADC event in Switzerland

Jimmy Nguyen, one of the foremost authorities on Bitcoin SV (BSV), is the founding president of the Bitcoin Association. This week, however, Nguyen is returning to his law roots as he takes part in the upcoming International Association of Defense Counsel’s International Corporate Counsel College event. 

This event will be held near Zurich, Switzerland, and brings together the in-house counsel for law firms, looking to educate and give them the opportunity to ask questions related to issues affecting global companies.

The two-day event will occur on October 24-25, with Nguyen set to be the keynote speaker on the 24th. He will also be part of a panel discussion the following day. The panel, “Smart Contracts: Everything You Wanted to Know, but Never Dared to Ask,” will take a close examination of the various uses and applications for blockchain technology. The specific focus will be on how this technology is becoming increasingly important to companies and how that will affect the legal counsel’s office.

The moderator of the panel will be Ianika Tzankova of Tzankova Legal Consulting and Tilburg University, in Tilburg, Netherlands. Other presenters will include Flaco Kreis of CMS Hasche Sigle in Munich and Gabriela Lippe-Hoist, the co-founder and director of Acqupart Holding AG.

Nguyen, a former digital technology lawyer since the 1990s, said in a statement related to his appearance at IADC:

Blockchain and smart contracts are game-changing for the legal profession, as well as businesses in all industries. I’m excited to bring what I’ve learned in my two decades of legal experience as a partner at major U.S. law firms, along with my current work in blockchain and cryptocurrency, to this gathering of top corporate lawyers in Europe. This event also gives me the opportunity to further explain how BSV is creating a regulation-friendly ecosystem, unlike so many other cryptocurrency camps, a message which will be supported by major enterprises and their corporate lawyers.

The IADC is an event hosted by the International Corporate Counsel College. This conference is proposed as an opportunity to bring together the “in-house counsel and their advisors to gain knowledge together and spend time with others who face similar issues.”

Find out more about the IADC event here.

Pumpkin Lady Lazar still talking about Craig Wright, joins Twetch

If you thought the Pumpkin Lady, Angelina Lazar, was done with Bitcoin SV (BSV), then you’ve got another thing coming. Since finding some measure of fame with the BSV community, Lazar has kept up her interactions with those still in the frenzy of Pumpkin mania, even so far as to trying out BSV herself.

Following our reporting on the contentious exchange between Dr. Craig Wright and Lazar, she continued to tweet about the man and pumpkins for several days, before finally volunteering to join Twetch on October 20 to put the matter to bed.

After receiving some help and free BSV from the community to get started, Lazar got a rockstar welcome from Twetch users, racking up 44 likes and 44 comments on her first post, and quickly gaining 30 followers:

Her Twetch profile describes her entry into the world of BSV as “all about depumpkinizing the pumpkin patch n’ I gotta’ come to the patch to do so. ¬ BTC-mania! Let’s rumble! xo¬A.” Regardless of that effort, she’s using Twetch to post about the latest goings-on in the Bitcoin world, noting about the recent BTC vs BSV debate hosted by Hotep Jesus, “BTC vs BSV (Debate 1), BTC lost. We need a 2nd Debate. And need to keep track of who wins each & every debate.”

That doesn’t mean that she’s come to love BSV and Craig Wright just yet. She’s challenged Wright numerous times to another duel, hoping she can best him this time.

For their part, the BSV crowd have embraced Lazar, perhaps hoping to win her over with the easy usability of BSV. One user tweeted at her, “Believe me there’s no hard feelings, most of us are all in good spirits just excited about the innovation.” And while others have kept up the jabs, she’s taken them in stride, telling them when they “get a pass” for whatever joke they were making.

As one eagle eye user noted though, now that Lazar is on Twetch, there could be a business model for her continued opposition to Dr. Craig Wright.

Poloniex splitting from Circle, ending service for US customers

Americans are about to lose one of their cryptocurrency options, as Poloniex is exiting the market. Circle have announced the exchange is “spinning out” of their portfolio, to be run by a new company.

The Circle Twitter account broke the news on October 18, providing details of the massive change:

While Circle emphasized the $100 million investment from an Asian group, users quickly noticed the exchange would be winding down for Americans in the fourth post of their Twitter thread. U.S. trading will cease on November 1, 2019, and withdrawals will end on December 15, 2019.

In an accompanying blog post written by Circle co-founders Sean Neville and Jeremy Allaire, Circle noted they would be making trading free between October 21, 2019 and the end of the year.

The good news, they wrote, was that this would allow Poloniex to have “the freedom and capital to compete in the international market, and the leadership team of Poloniex will be equipped to scale and grow beyond the scope of what Circle can provide.”

They also noted that Circle made the decision to spin out Poloniex to focus on “mainstream use cases for payments, investment, lending and fundraising.” That includes a renewed focus on their crowdfunding platform SeedInvest, and generally to focus on “a world with an open financial system.”

Eagle-eyed American Bitcoin SV (BSV) community members quickly noted that this marks the loss of another exchange on which they can trade for BSV; but others like noted community member WallStreet5 quickly suggested alternatives.

Poloniex was in the Circle family of products for less than two years. Circle initially purchased the exchange in February, 2018, paying $400 million for the exchange and promising it would “represent everything of value.”

They’ve since maintained an impartial stance in the cryptocurrency space, notably not taking sides during the contentious 2018 hard fork which saw BSV reborn to continue the original vision of Satoshi Nakamoto. They’ve also tried to do right by their users each step of the way, cancelling out trading fees in August to pay back lost BTC from their May flash crash.

SiGMA 2019 shines spotlight on AI, blockchain

It is a little over a month until SiGMA 2019 event kicks off in Malta, but the event already promises to be one that should provide an impressive assortment of speakers and presenters on the latest innovations. This is especially true in artificial intelligence (AI) and blockchain technology, where eight different presentations are scheduled during the three-day event.

SiGMA 2019 kicks off on November 27, and AI and Blockchain will highlight the first day. Jimmy Nguyen will get things started by providing his insights on how Bitcoin SV (BSV) has made the iGaming sector a focus for the upcoming year. Nguyen is the Founding President of the Bitcoin Association, and will address how BSV could very well become the leading digital currency for iGaming.

The first three presentations will all be based around BSV, which will include a 25-minute discussion on how it could very well replace such digital wallets as PayPal.

Discussions of blockchain technology will be showcased during this event. That starts at 14:55, with a discussion on how this technology is growing within the industry, and what that will exactly mean for iGaming. Also part of the discussion will be how tokenized assets will be implemented by operators to reduce costs and streamline gaming.

The final three presentations should be fascinating. The first will look at how blockchain applications are already being heavily used within iGaming and how there is a need to use this technology to a higher degree.

That will be followed by a discussion on the advancements in this technology in relation to esports. With esports growing in popularity across the globe, the need for improved technology to handle the large number of players, tournaments, and other competitions is creating a need for a more efficient and secure system. This will be addressed during this presentation.

Finally, Nguyen will be joined by Dr. Craig Wright as they discuss the future of blockchain and how it relates to iGaming. This will be an informal discussion, which will not only allow participants to receive valuable information but will also allow them to ask questions and interact with two of the leading minds in Bitcoin.

As blockchain continues to become a technology that is dominating the Internet, this presentation should be one that few other sectors can match in terms of importance. Register for the event now and make sure you don’t miss out.

Craig Wright CC Forum duel ends in shouting and pumpkins

The CC Forum on blockchain, AI and digital innovations, with its many panels and duels of differently opinionated experts, was bound to have some fireworks. The duel between Dr. Craig Wright, inventor of Bitcoin, and Mike Beaver, macro economist and global growth investor, paid off with many explosive moments and testy exchanges.

Hosted by Eric Van Der Kleij, CEO of the Frontier Network, the duel titled “Bitcoin does not have any real value, or does it?” started off with an explanation from Beaver that he is not a cyberforensic auditor, as Dr. Wright once was, but a chartered financial analyst, “looking at this from a financial, economic and strategy, and bigger picture perspectives.” He only promised to argue based on a valuation of Bitcoin, and not any technical perspectives.

Beaver began by knocking down several perspectives that would lend value to Bitcoin. It’s not backed by an asset and it has no value. Van Der Kleij asked if you could assess a value from user confidence, to which Wright immediately replied no, and Beaver said it would be very hard to prove one. So finally, Beaver said the best bet is to look at the business angle, technology angle and regulatory angle, to which Wright said, “He’s fine.”

Wright then redefined the argument, noting that the commonly accepted concept of Bitcoin is flawed. It can be seized, he noted, and he created Bitcoin to create “honest records”. Ultimately, it will create a system of microtransaction rewards that will improve the services we use.

Van Der Kleij, seemingly stepping into the duel himself, after he said: “But Craig, that’s more about the utility of Bitcoin rather than the value.”

Craig responded: “That is what it is. That is value, utility. Tell me if I’m wrong, utility is value. Goods and services, things people want to use, is value. Money is not value. Money is not wealth. You have been lied to. There is no great wealth creation because of new shitcoins. Money is not wealth. Goods and services are wealth.”

At that point, the differing views of what value means in the world of Bitcoin really became apparent, as the duel broke down. While Beaver wanted to focus on the value of Bitcoin, and price of it, Wright preferred to talk about why exchanges like Binance, because of their alleged money laundering practices, are no threat to Bitcoin due to the increasing regulations in the world. He also returned to why micropayments make Bitcoin valuable.

That wasn’t the topic Beaver wanted to discuss though, as he kept returning to the risks to the price of Bitcoin. When again pressed on the topic, Dr. Wright noted that he himself was a risk, due to his massive holdings in Bitcoin. Finally, Wright tried to put a nail in the topic:

I don’t care. That simple. I’ve got a great company, with a great team, we’re expanding, we’re setting up new offices. Investment wise, I don’t need to do anything. People throw money at us if we want it. We’re not actually taking any and they keep offering it. People want us to do an IPO at nChain. Why? Because we have fucking patents.

It was at that point that the crowd started getting into it, as Petur Georgesson, managing partner at Capital Sniper Investments, asked how much the price of BTC might decline by this time in 2020. After commenting that he didn’t care, because he’s more focused on building things, he offered that 90% of the price of BTC might fade away.

At that point, the split between BTC and BSV became the topic, as Mike Beaver wanted to continue discussing the risks to BTC from other cryptocurrencies, insisting that was the topic, while Dr. Wright pointed out that Bitcoin is Bitcoin SV (BSV). But to answer the core question, he responded that BSV is protected from the competition by his armor of patents.

That confused Beaver, who then bemoaned:

So Craig wants us to talk about this whole topic of debate, the value of BSV. We were talking about the value of BTC, now we’re talking about the value of BSV, well why not the other 3000 coins. There’s a lot of interesting and talented developers there, sooner or later, we know one thing with technology, it only ever, in the long term, improves.

Wright then expanded on how the patents he’s been working on will keep BSV at the top of the pile, noting that any other crypto hoping to use the technology he’s built will have to pay for the right to do so, while BSV will be subsidized.

The debate continued in the manner for a few more minutes, with Beaver focusing on the competition raised by competitors to BSV and Wright repeatedly slapping them down with patents that already protect them from serious harm.

Seeking to change the tone, Van Der Kleij opened it up to the crowd to ask questions. Sir Toshi, noted BSV enthusiast, asked Beaver about LTC, which Beaver entirely ignored to return to his line of questioning and instead asked about how regulations might threaten various cryptocurrencies. While Beaver perceived this as a threat to the industry, Wright noted that he welcomes regulation to squash cryptos that don’t follow the law.

Wright was then asked by a member of the crowd why he didn’t patent Bitcoin when he first invented it. Wright responded that, in 2008, he didn’t believe it was possible to patent the technology. Also, he published it under the pseudonym Satoshi Nakamoto, and thought he couldn’t patent Bitcoin if he used an alias.

When asked if his patent library could prevent future innovation, Wright responded that it’s proven that by patenting technology, you not only protect it from copy cats, but you encourage others to recreate a piece of technology with the same purpose but by a different method, thus spurring innovation.

Beaver then disputed Wright’s point that patents would protect Bitcoin from competitors going forward, noting that patents expire and would eventually allow for someone else to create a better version of the technology. The discussion didn’t go very far though, as it was interrupted by none other than Tone Vays.

It was at this point that the duel produced the moments it will forever be remembered by. Tone Vays, recalling the moment in the previous fireside chat where Wright suggested that his university papers prove he was Satoshi, or was plagiarized by Satoshi, Vays preferred to go with the latter suggestion, and suggested that the crowd should not consider Wright relevant to the topic of Bitcoin as a result, suggesting Craig Wright is a fraud.

Wright responded:

It doesn’t matter what your vacuous ideas are. It doesn’t matter whether you like my patents. It doesn’t matter whether you like nChain. In five years’ time, when we have another 1000 patents granted, and we have IBM, and we have Microsoft, and we have Apple, and we have Google, and we have all these companies paying us money, you can choose not to have anything to do with me. The same way you can chose not to have anything to do with the internet.

That was too much for one woman in the crowd, who yelled out: “That’s exactly what you want. You are a mole, trying to crash Bitcoin. Farmer Craig. Pumpkin man Craig. Go back to your farm, your pumpkins and your tomatoes and grow a superfarm.”

That’s when the duel totally fell apart. Wright responded that she’d just have to live with his invention. Tone Vays, still holding the microphone in the crowd, suggested Wright would be in jail in the next couple of years, Georgesson yelled from the other side of the crowd that he really wanted to hear a discussion on valuation still, and Beaver begged to make a final point about traceability.

As the duel finally reached a new semblance of decorum, Beaver commented that if blockchain technology truly guarantees traceability for every transaction, there is no value created by a notion of anonymity, ruining a selling point of BTC adherents. Wright flat out agreed.

Van Der Kleij noted that time had ran out on the duel and sought to bring an end to it. It didn’t end easily though, as the woman in the crowd once again began yelling at Wright, who responded to her as Beaver begged to make a final point about the declining value of an asset through use and surplus.

Craig Wright on nChain patents, pumpkin farming disaster at CC Forum

Dr. Craig Wright is no stranger to fireside chats, having previously sat down with Bitcoin Association Founding President Jimmy Nguyen to discuss the history of Bitcoin’s creation. To discuss the larger world of cryptocurrency, he recently sat down with the CEO of the Frontier Network, Eric Van Der Kleij, at the CC Forum on Blockchain, AI and Digital Innovation.

Van Der Kleij was quick to point out that the CC Forum wasn’t afraid about hearing Dr. Wright’s side of the truth, and asked what nChain has been up to. After covering how he came to nChain from his Bitcoin exile, Wright noted that nChain has been very busy patenting his innovations, with 826 currently filed, 1450 in the pipline, and approximately 200 granted or about to be.

When asked what Dr. Wright wants to do with these patents, he responded “Choose how the industry moves.” Van Der Kleij wondered if this might prevent others from using the innovations, to which Wright noted “They can do what they want, as long as they pay licensing fees.”

Once again pressed if this might prevent others from innovating on blockchain technology, Wright quipped “Do I care?” Once Van Der Kleij accepted that answer, Wright explained:
Stifle creativity? What creativity? We have STOs running around saying that they’re new because they’re a token. So what? Wealth isn’t money. Wealth is the creation of goods, services, assets, capital. Because you’ve created a token, so what? That just makes you another scammy loser. If you create a token, and you don’t have a business, you don’t have anything. You’ve got Tone Vays over there, that’s it. Empty, vacuous.”

Changing topic, Van Der Kleij then tried to turn the discussion to Dr. Wright’s ongoing legal battle in Florida, but Wright refused, noting that reporting and crypto twitter speculation has been far off base. “I’ve used toilet paper with more accuracy.”

Van Der Kleij then turned to Bitcoin’s intent to follow the law from the start, which Wright explained:

It’s intended to work in the law. The last sentence says ‘will follow rules.’ Rules include law. The difference between a rule and law is, law is a rule with a consequence. It is a subset of the word. And miners don’t create rules, they enforce rules. I keep stressing this, I’m going to start buying copies of the Oxford and Cambridge dictionary for people so that they can actually read the whitepaper and understand what these words mean.

On that note, he was asked about John McAfee’s new decentralized exchange, which lacks know your customer (KYC) protocols and opens it up to terrorist financing. “And Mr. McAfee, like everyone else, will eventually get caught,” Wright responded. “Blockchain is an immutable evidence trail. It is utterly traceable. It is the opposite of what everyone’s been running around. It is private, but not anonymous. Those records are admissible.”

On that note, Van Der Kleij noted that while he might not have total belief in Dr. Wright’s identity as Satoshi, he agrees with him on so much, but he wants to have more proof of his claims. “You don’t prove anything by moving a coin,” Wright responded. “The university still has my thesis from 2008. They still have my proposal. So I guess on that one alone, you can make the decision when it comes out, which it will.”

That led to a comment which would later prove to be explosive. “You can make the decision: did Satoshi plagiarize me? Because there are sections of the whitepaper, whole paragraphs, in some of my work.” Van Der Kleij was first baffled by the comment, and Tone Vays would later question if Wright was admitting to not be Satoshi, although the intent of the comment is clearly that Dr. Craig Wright is Satoshi, if not for another leap in logic to reach a different conclusion. “You can make the choice, I don’t really care,” Wright concluded.

Ultimately, when asked if Wright cares if his integrity is called into question, he responded that he really doesn’t. As nChain has already cornered the market on blockchain patents, big businesses like Wal-Mart will ultimately be forced to come to Dr. Wright for the technology they need. Van Der Kleij suggested that the world might be more accepting of Dr. Wright if he would prove his integrity. Wright railed back:

“So what you’re saying is, ‘you don’t do my way, that’s not integrity. We want this. We demand you do this. We want Bitcoin to be this way. [Van Der Keij interrupts ‘No, suggest’]. No, demand. It’s demand. You want me to be what you want me to be. So therefore…”

Concluding the discussion of Bitcoin and Dr. Wright’s history, Van Der Keij finally worried that Dr. Wright might be forcing his way on the world of blockchain. “It’s my invention, invent something else,” Wright retorted, rousing applause from a section of the crowd.

What came next might be the part that has received the most attention from the fireside chat, as Van Der Keij tried to lighten the mood by asking about Dr. Wright’s gardening habits, asking him about his tomato garden. “I actually used to have bonsai trees as well, and they’re all dead now,” he started. “I had some really good old bonsai trees, and bloody nChain and all the travel I have to do, every single one of them is dead. My tomatoes, they keep bursting and things like that, because I’m not there to do things. And the gardener sucks, because the last time, he actually mowed by pumpkins.”

“That’s probably not advisable,” Van Der Keij concluded.

BitcoinFiles: An awesome way to share digital content via BSV

The introduction of cryptocurrency and blockchain has spawned an entirely new way to do business. The power of blockchain technology is seemingly endless, with a myriad of potential applications and solutions that are able to revolutionize how companies operate and share information. Even beyond that, though, there are everyday practical solutions for individuals, as well, and one of the most noticeable is BitcoinFiles. It has proven to be an amazing way to store and share data and is made possible because of the Bitcoin SV (BSV) blockchain.

BitcoinFiles lets anyone store and share virtually any type of content—images, files, documents—right on the blockchain. This means that, even 100 years from now, that same data will be right there, ready to be viewed to anyone who has access. No data loss, no data corruption, no possible way for the information to be changed.

Once on the site, uploading the information is a piece of cake. Select the type of file—image, text, HTML, JavaScript, etc.—and then upload it. Uploading requires a link to a MoneyButton BSV wallet, but this is simply to ensure the integrity of the data. After that, record the hash code and you’re all done.

Any type of data can be uploaded and stored, but this doesn’t mean that there aren’t procedures in place to ensure the data is legitimate and legal. BitcoinFiles records IP addresses and the BSV community has already shown what happens when someone tries to store illegal content.

It isn’t even necessary to visit the website in order to upload information. The minds behind the project have created an application that allows the functionality to be integrated into other platforms, such as a website, so that data can be uploaded to and stored on the BSV blockchain from anywhere. With the virtually unlimited scaling possibilities of BSV, this means that even the most robust websites could be completely built and maintained right on the blockchain.

It took the public about 15 years to get used to the idea of email after it was invented. It has only taken about two for blockchain’s potential to begin to be realized. Applications like BitcoinFiles are helping to facilitate the next wave of innovative solutions and it’s amazing to try to envision where we’ll be even as soon as five years from now.

TrueReviews.io runs successful alpha test on BSV blockchain

TrueReviews.io was one of the standout projects at the Bitcoin Association’s recent Pitch Day in Seoul, South Korea. Not wanting to lose that momentum, the project recently had successful limited alpha test, inviting real users to start using the service and test its limits.

True Reviews, founded by Connor Murray, seeks to solve the problem of fake or unfair business reviews by removing advertising from the experience, and instead replacing it with a Bitcoin SV (BSV) reward system.

The site began looking for alpha testers on October 12, quickly finding several dozen to help give the project a good once over. Murray returned to Twitter on October 15 to announce the results of the test.

The 62 registered users created 76 reviews of businesses, and those reviews earned a total of 267 tokenized reputation points. Murray noted one user racked up a high of a 51 point reputation score, while another set the high for most reviews with 13.

This wasn’t just for fun though, as he noted that the real goal was to stress test the software, and prepare it to be more feature-filled in the future.

The site promises to be much more than just a review system in the future. Once businesses get involved, the site’s “About Us” section notes that it could become a great system of marketing and reward in the future:

In exchange for a verified review, tokenized rewards (gift cards, coupons, etc) can be issued to the reviewer and redeemed at the business.

If you’re unfamiliar with Murray, he has been a mainstay of the BSV community for quite some time. He spoke at the Expo-Bitcoin International conference in Bogota, Colombia, about the importance of BSV adoption to solving global economic problems. He also hosts the Bitcoin and Beyond YouTube channel, where he’s previously interviewed Dr. Craig Wright on the history of Bitcoin, and the tense relationship the nChain chief scientist has with many of his rivals.